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Gender inequality as a predictor of Indian men's higher-risk sex

Rajeev Colaco, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Shelah S. Bloom, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Chirayath Suchindran, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Kavita Singh, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Kathryn E. Moracco, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Data from India’s National Family Health Survey (NFHS-3) were used to conduct stratified analyses to explore whether attitudes toward gender equality influenced higher-risk sex among married (n=7,406) and unmarried (n=4,834) men in India’s Uttar Pradesh and Uttarakhand states. Descriptive statistics and logistic regression models were used to explore the independent influence of gender inequality factors on higher-risk sex. After controlling for socio-demographic variables, men who were significantly more likely to report higher-risk sex were those with a history of family violence [OR=1.83(1.06-3.17) for married men; OR=1.93(1.45-2.58) for unmarried men], favored wife-abuse [OR=1.93(1.10-3.37) for married men], felt that men had the right to punish wives who refused having sex [OR=1.87(1.19-2.95) for unmarried men], and felt that women should not have the right to refuse sex [OR=2.16(1.05-4.48) for married men]. HIV/STI prevention efforts promoting gender equality acceptance among Indian men are likely to contribute to a reduction in men’s higher-risk sexual behaviors.

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Presented in Poster Session 1: Poster Session 1: reproductive health, HIV-AIDS, poverty and gender